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  • The Maltese Falcon – Back In Theatres This February!

    Posted on February 9th, 2016 "Tiki Chris" Pinto No comments

    maltese-falcon-poster75 years ago, John Huston unleashed onto an unsuspecting public a film that would become one of, if not the most iconic gumshoe detective mystery movies of all time, The Maltese Falcon.
    You can’t utter the words “Film Noir” without The Maltese Falcon coming to mind. From Bogart’s portrayal of ‎Dashiell Hammett’s Sam Spade, to the multiple twists and turns, to the bitter ending, this slice of the dark side of peoples’ lives has become the standard by which all other films of its kind are measured.

    And now it’s back on the Silver Screen, in glorious black and white, for its 75th anniversary. Now that’s the stuff that dreams are made of.

    Click here for showtimes, locations and tickets through Fathom Events.

    Click here for the Tiki Lounge Talk’s take on The Maltese Falcon for Noir Movie Monday.


    Tiki Chris, reporting from the screening room at Tiki Lounge Talk

  • Go See “Hail, Caesar!” As Soon As You Can! The Best Mid-Century Era Movie in Years

    Posted on February 8th, 2016 "Tiki Chris" Pinto 1 comment

    hail caesar brolin Once every few years a new mid-century period movie comes out that has the perfect blend of nostalgia, wit, and entertainment. Here it is, kids…

    Hail, Caesar!

    for Mod Movie Monday at Tiki Lounge Talk, starring Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Channing Tatum, Alden Ehrenreich, Hobie Doyle, Ralph Fiennes, Scarlett Johansson, Tilda Swinton.

    (NO Spoilers, just some fun facts)

    I won’t go into the basic idea of what the movie is about…you can read about that anywhere. I’m going to tell you why, as one who digs mid-century coolness, you will dig this movie and need to see it on the Big Screen.
    “Hail, Caesar!” takes place sometime around 1950-51, and is set in Los Angeles (after all, it’s a movie about the movie business).

    hail caesar johannson mermaidSo here we are, transported back to the early 1950s. Now you might expect the movie to hit us over the head with imagery and symbolism of that era. Well, the Coen Brothers (The Big Lebowski, No Country for Old Men, Fargo, The Man Who Wasn’t There) are too good to resort to that kind of shtick. They have their own brand of shtick, and it’s subtle…it’s in the spoofiness of the whole thing, and how every scene is shot in such a way that it reminds you of another movie, one from the actual era.

    The movie starts off in a timeless way, then before you realize it, the nostalgia bits are added in and multiplied. These start out small (an actress taking “dirty pictures” (read: full but skimpy clothing) in the middle of the night, a meeting at the Imperial Garden (“They have the best Mai Tai’s here), and time-establishing shots of Brolin’s wristwatch, which looked like it was probably from the 1930s.

    hail caesar tatumFrom there the Hollywood spoofing takes center stage, with incredibly fun scenes that mimic some of our favorite movies from the 1930s, 40s and 50s. These scenes include an aquatic dance number complete with mermaid (think Ester Williams), a cowboy guitar & song (Gene Autry), and a fully-executed sailor dance number that would have fit right in to “On the Town” (well, most of it). Watching that sequence featuring Channing Tatum, all I could think was, Gene Kelley and Frank Sinatra are looking down and laughing their asses off. Well done.

    And then of course there’s George Clooney’s character, they typical big star, a playboy and the kind of 1950s actor who could bring tears to an audience with one line. Also, not so bright, and easily influenced, which helps carry the main story line to a really fun and cool ending. I applaud Clooney for taking this role, and he was fantastic in it.

    But the real juiciness it that dotted throughout the movie is pretty much EVERY possible nod the era’s nostalgia and movies of the time, including:

    A mid-century modern Malibu house overlooking the ocean (compete with bar)
    Close-up of the Cadillac nameplate on the chrome dashboard of the car
    A lasso-wielding singing cowboy who does his own stunts
    4-button multiline telephones
    Vaudeville/slapstick comedy (where you least expect it)
    Hollywood cover-ups (I won’t spoil it)
    Carmen Miranda-ish character
    Twins routine
    Dance routines out of nowhere
    Actual songs from the era, as background music
    Romans (of course)
    Black and White “artsy” movie within the movie, with odd camera angles
    Over-dramatic, high-society type director who is incredibly serious about his musical
    “Epic” movie splash screen
    Backlot shots of Roman columns next to modern cars
    Stars who’ve had multiple marriages
    The future of aviation (Lockheed)
    The future of TV replacing movies
    Intellectuals sitting around discussing things but not taking action (until they take action)
    Cool Chinese Restaurant/Almost a Tiki Bar
    Finger Sandwiches
    1950’s Housewife (with a line to her husband something like “You know what’s best”)
    One of those old lawn chairs with the plastic webbing
    Atomic Bomb
    Snoopy reporter
    Panel van
    Old movie cameras
    Alligator-skin briefcase
    Dailies complete with cards that say things like “Big Credits Here”,

    hail caesar clooney…and probably a whole lot more I can’t remember, as there’s so much going on it’s impossible to get it all in one viewing.

    The Ester Williams-style number is incredibly fun to watch, as is Tatum’s dance routine (I like that the movie gives us full numbers, not just a 15 second snippet). Even the cowpoke’s song is a hoot.

    So, my recommendation…It’s a great movie, fun plot, exceptional characters, the right amount of nostalgia without it being obvious, unbelievable dance numbers, and laugh-out-loud comedy, plus visuals that will make you wish you lived back in 1951.

    -Tiki Chris P. reporting from the screening room at Capitol Studios, Hollywood.


    Trailer One:


    Trailer Two:

  • Doctor Who and the Daleks, 1965 for Mod Movie Monday

    Posted on August 11th, 2014 "Tiki Chris" Pinto 1 comment

    dr-who-and-the-daleksBeen a while since I did a “Mod Movie Monday” post, mainly because I’ve been busy with doing some much-need restoration on my 1953 Chevy Bel Air Custom, writing a new paranormal murder mystery, and launching a new idea…more on that later.

    So here we go, kats and kittens, back to our regularly schedule program. This week we feature

    Doctor Who and the Daleks

    from 1965, starring Peter Cushing as The Doctor.

    This movie was produced “outside” the original series universe, and as such, die-hard Who fans may find it a little annoying that it doesn’t follow the established theme. But the Doctor is still somewhat of a mad scientist, he still has traveling companions (in this, his two grand daughters and one of their boyfriends), the TARDIS is still a blue police box and bigger on the inside, and they still travel through space and time with special effects that remind you of Lost in Space. And it’s the mid-1960s, so there’s a kind of cold war-era peaceful-people-fighting-against-fascist-overlords kind of vibe.

    Here’s the trailer:

    Food & Booze: You’ll want something far-out, futuristic and still 1960s to go with this. I’d suggest Saturn Sliders (little burgers with big onion rings around them) and for drinks, Blue Neptune Cocktails in a tall, clear glass (see recipe below).

    My Take: If you like Doctor Who, or just dig kookie movies from the mod era, you’ll dig it. From the TARDIS interior (which looks more like a black box theater than a space ship) to the annoying Daleks, it’s a fun treat that will whisk you back to the past before accelerating you to the future.

    Blue Neptune Cocktail recipe:

    2 oz good vodka
    1 splash Blue Curacao (Just enough to make it blue)
    1/2 oz Triple Sec
    Juice of 1/2 Lemon
    Superfine Sugar
    1 Lemon peel
    1 Orange wheel

    Mix all ingredients except lemon and orange in a shaker with ice. Strain over a tall clear glass half full of ice and garnish with the twisty lemon peel and orange wheel. You can secure the peel to the wheel with a sword or pick, and add a cherry if you are so inclined.

    Tiki Chris P. reporting from the time machine at Tiki Lounge Talk

    Oh, I almost forgot…that new idea I’m working on: Yours truly is embarking on a little side biz. Starting now, I’ll be offering my cool & kookie services as a vintage-theme party DJ in the South Florida are. That’s right…I’m putting the thousands of songs I’ve collected over the years to good use. So if you know anyone who wants to have a retro theme party, I’m you man…as long as it’s somewhere between West Palm Beach and Miami, Florida. Check out the new website for the low down. By the way…in that world, I’m known as “Riff”.

  • Remembering Mickey Rooney (Sept. 23, 1920 – April 6, 2014)

    Posted on April 7th, 2014 "Tiki Chris" Pinto No comments

    rooneyLet’s take a moment to remember one of  our favorite actors, Mickey Rooney (Sept. 23, 1920 – April 6, 2014)

    He was Santa in Santa Claus is Comin’ To Town (1970). He was only six when he acted in his first movie, “Not To Be Trusted” (1926). He had already become a star, making over three dozen Mickey McGuire shorts before his 15th birthday. Then came the Andy Hardy films, and his pairing with the lovely Judy Garland. He became the #1 box office draw in the US before age 20, and held that honor from 1939 to 1941.

    Born in Brooklyn, NY on September 23, 1920, Mickey hit the stage not long after his first birthday, appearing with his parents in vaudeville shows. From there he catapulted to stardom, winning a special Academy Award in 1939 for “bringing to the screen the spirit and personification of youth, and . . . setting a high standard of ability and achievement.”

    Most of us remember watching Mickey Rooney in reruns on Saturday afternoons. Some of us remember him from Dinsey’s “Pete’s Dragon” (1977), or from the dozens of TV show and movie appearances he made throughout the past 60 years, including The Golden Girls, Murder She Wrote, The Return of Mickey Spillane’s Mike Hammer, It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, and his own TV series “Mickey” (1964-65). More recent roles include Babe: Pig in the City (1998), The Muppets, and one of his best ever, in my opinion, as Gus in Night at the Museum (2006).

    According to Mickey Rooney’s IMDB page, he was still working, with three projects currently in filming or pre.production. That’s not bad for a 93 year-old.


    There aren’t many actors who can claim nine decades of work, and nearly eight of stardom. Mickey was a one of a kind, and we’re lucky to have had him in our lives for so long. A true part of American film history, Mickey Rooney will always be remembered as one of the top stars of the 20th and 21st centuries, and one of the last from the first golden era of film and television to remain with us.

    Break a leg Mickey!
    -Chris Pinto, for Tiki Lounge Talk

  • Noir Movie Monday: The Big Heat, 1953

    Posted on January 6th, 2014 "Tiki Chris" Pinto 2 comments

    the-big-heat-posterIt’s hard for a movie from the 1950s to be so harsh that it can still shock today’s jaded viewers, but

    The Big Heat

    still packs a couple of punches that will make you gasp.

    (no spoilers)

    Set in early ’50s Kentport (basically Los Angeles), The Big Heat shows us a glimpse into the lives of brutal gangsters, women of questionable morals, straight cops, crooked cops, politicians on the payroll and cold-blooded murderers.

    The Big Heat is a classic noir film directed by Fritz Lang, with award-winning actor Glenn Ford at the helm. As detective Sgt. Dave Bannion, he uncovers a network of criminals and crooked cops running the city, getting away with anything they want for a buck. But he steps to close to the action, and his life crumbles in the fallout.

    Shot in gritty black and white with those shadows and effects that make a good noir movie great, The Big Heat is one of the most impactful, realistic thrillers of the era. Ford does a fantastic job of keeping his character low key yet intense. He’s serious…all business, because his work is serious, as are the consequences of his well-intended actions.The-Big-Heat-motel-room

    I don’t like to give anything away in my posts, but without spoiling I can say this: If you remember hearing about an old movie where someone gets a pot of boiling hot coffee thrown in their face, this is it. That should give you an idea of how far this movie goes, blowing away our current perception of 1950s censors’ standards.

    The Big Heat also features a young Lee Marvin in a role that suits him well, but that you might find in opposition to what he is usually known for. It also features Gloria Grahame (know for her role as Ado Annie in Oklahoma) as the sarcastic, alcoholic and fed-up gangster girlfriend.Big-Heat-mirror

    Dinner & Drinks: There’s a scene where Bannion and his wife share a gargantuan steak. Seriously, I don’t think they make cows that big anymore. If you can find one, go for it. Highballs and Martinis are appropriate for this cocktail-era moving picture.

    My Take: The first time I tried to watch this movie I couldn’t get into it. Granted, I was distracted while trying to watch it, but my issue was that I was expecting a bullet-riddled B-movie with a lot of action. I was wrong; The Big Heat is an intelligent movie, well written and very well acted. The pace builds as the action intensifies. It’s important that you regard this movie on par with The Maltese Falcon, Double Indemnity or The Lost Weekend.

    the-big-heat-glenn-fordTiki Chris P. reporting from the Screening Room at Tiki Lounge Talk

    If you love Noir fiction, check out my Noir mystery books, including the Detective Bill Riggins series at